a studio visit to now pottery

The last artist I visited in summer 2020 was Irit Biran from Now pottery ceramics studio.

Her serene studio is located in Sde-Varburg, in the center of Israel, next to her house and surronded by green fields and blue clear skies. We sat together with two beautiful espresso cups, grapes (the tasty kind that you can find only in Israel) and a delicious date & nut treat she made, to hear her story.


photo: Irit Biran

photo: irit Biran

photo: Inbal Ithachi

photo: Inbal Ithachi


After twenty five years as a lawyer, Irit started a new chapter, where she wished to combine her motherhood and family time, together with the things she liked to do, in a more balanced way then before. She was always a creative person and her biggest love is cooking. From a need of tableware for her food, she took a once-a-week pottery class, that soon become a twice a week. She made a small corner in her house for practicing on the potter's wheel and started to make presents for friends.


photo: Inbal Ithachi

photo: Irit Biran


The feeling of finding her center and the meditative process on the potter's wheel, made her fall in love and in 2014 she opened a small studio, next to her house. After a while she decided that this is what she wants to do next, and named it, Now pottery studio. The name "Now" came from the wish to be in the "here and now" and in that specific moment of the gathering, while eating the food on our plate.


Her focus is always on food, gathering and tableware. Before Covid she used to host very special table sharing meals. Each gathering was around a different theme. Irit also has a wonderful blog where you can find her delicious recipes.


photo: Inbal Ithachi

photo: Inbal Ithachi

photo: Inbal Ithachi


Irit works on different collections, her inspiration comes from both Japan and the Scandinavian style. She sees the table as a portrait. Her tableware serves that favorite routine of hers, of gathering around the table with family and friends, or even alone. She is always looking for the connection between the tableware that she creates, to the food that it's holding and to the people that use her cups, bowls, or plates.


photo: Inbal Ithachi

photo: Irit Biran


All of her work is one of a kind, created with traditional methods, on the potter's wheel by hand. She believes, and I have to agree, that you can feel the energy of the hand-made process, when you're holding her cup or bowl. Irit's style is basic and functional, simple and beautiful as a poem or a painting. She creates her clean and minimalist ceramics work, in such an elegant way with a lot of peacefulness. Thank you Irit for sharing your story with me, I hope soon we can all come back to gathering again with the ones we love.